Grow Your Own Insect Repellent?

Did you know that you can grow your own plants that will work as insect repellent? There are a number of plants that will repel mosquitos as well as gnats, ticks, fleas, and other bugs. It gives you a chance to get outside and work in your garden, and they add some aesthetic appeal to your backyard.

Pennyroyal is probably one of the best plants to grow if you’re looking for something that repels insects. It helps repel mosquitos, gnats, ticks, and fleas. Once the plant is grown all you have to do is crush the leaves and rub the oil on your skin, and you’ve got a powerful mosquito repellent that also smells pretty good. Feverfew is another great plant for repelling mosquitos and other flying insects. The perfect spot to plant it is near outdoor seating areas and close to doorways. You’ve likely already heard of citronella grass. This plant is used in many insect repellent sprays already. As with these other plants, once the citronella has matured, you simply crush up some leaves and rub the oil on your skin. The best way to take advantage of these great plants is to grow a number of them close to areas you might frequently hang out in your backyard, increasing you insect repelling power.

Do you grow any insect repelling plants? What is the best way to use them in your opinion?

About smithereenpestmanagement

Smithereen Pest Management provides IPM pest services to residential and commercial clients in Kansas, Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana and Missouri. http://www.smithereen.com/
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